What helps travel sickness?

What helps travel sickness?

Check out the Travel Visor now!

Do what you can to reduce stress

The one thing that exacerbates travel sickness is stress and anxiety often caused by an issue that arises just before or during a journey.

It usually pays to do as much planning as you can before a journey starts. Have a check-list of things that you need to take and things that you need to do. That way you won’t suddenly remember things that you’ve forgotten while travelling. This is a sure way to add to the overall stress level.

When people travel by air and experience air travel sickness, part of the problem can be put down to the fact that they have travel some distance by road or rail to get to the airport.

With the brain trying to unscramble the effects of this it is then loaded with the extra challenge of riding on an aircraft. It only take a dose of turbulence to take everything over the edge

The brain becomes overloaded and, if it were a computer, wants to ‘crash’. With a computer it’s easy, you just press a button and you’re up and running again. All you have to do is go back to where you last saved and carry on.

We can’t work like computers. The best thing I find is that having a good night’s sleep does the trick. This is when we actually shut down and start up again in the morning but it never works out like that.

Most people who ask about how to reduce travel sickness have tried just about every pill and remedy that’s out there.

I’ve tried it all and nothing has worked for me. Although I must declare that I had a brief encounter with a homeopathic remedy and it actually worked. I couldn’t make any sense of the fact that there was no medicine in the medicine. It worked for me for few months and I was quite enthusiastic about it and then the effect started to tail-off.

I kept on taking it in hopes that there would be a recovery but it didn’t happen. I did, however, suffer a slight side effect. While I kept on taking it I went through a period of otherwise unexplained depression. I had no reason for this. I put it down to the homeopathic tablets and stopped taking them immediately and the problem ceased.

There then followed a period of considerable frustration. The travel sickness wasn’t going to go away, I’d tried everything and nothing worked.

I then began to try and understand the logic of why we get travel sick. I understood the issue of the balancing mechanism in our ears and the correlation between this and our vision.

It was when I was looking at the computer screen one day. I was looking at one of those racing car games where you follow along a road and suddenly started to feel queasy.

How could this be. I wasn’t moving along, I was sat still albeit on as swivel chair but I wasn’t moving.

This made me think that the problem was largely to do with what the eye sees. With this in mind I started to do some simple basic test when travelling as a passenger. I took measures to reduce the amount of moving information that came to me as I travelled along.

Putting it simply I setup a crude form of blinkers, cutting out what I would normally see out of the corner of each eye.

This delivered some success in fact it made quite a difference. It was enough to justify the considerable amount of development work that followed.

Having some experience in design and rudimentary engineering, I was able to start making and testing a basic visor. I now knew what the target was. I needed to reduce the amount of visual information that reached the brain.

It’s logic, if the brain isn’t presented with information then it won’t try to process it and try to make sense of it. The aim was to force the brain to only see what was coming from the front view. The moving information that comes to us from left and right can be blocked out.

This side view information is so difficult to process because, firstly the eye can’t focus on it properly to be able to present it to the brain in an organised fashion. Secondly, because of the fast movement, the volume of information is just too much for the brain to cope with. The brain then suffers overload and tries to ‘crash’.

It’s my theory that this is only a problem for those of us who suffer from travel sickness. We have brains that try to process the fast moving information that comes to the eyes from all directions. Those who don’t have a problem have brains that don’t attempt to do anything with this information.

This can only be put down to the variation in nature.

So I developed this visor and I wear it when ever I’m a passenger in a car. It’s designed to filter out all of the moving information that you don’t need to see but leave you with enough of a view to appreciate the journey.

The difference this has made for me when travelling by road is enormous. After a long journey as a passenger I’m now relaxed and I have a clear mind to think with. I regularly boast that, after a journey, I can use the most complicated software on my computer to good effect.

So here it is. The Gamlin Travel Visor, I’m pleased with it and, if you suffer from travel sickness, I think you would be to.

 

The Visor, preventing motion sickness

 

Preventing motion sickness can be a miserable challenge for those who suffer. Wearing the Gamlin Travel visor will make a big difference.

It’s the practical solution for passengers travelling by road or rail. The Visor is so simple to use. It will simply cut out all of the fast-moving visual information that’s presented to the passenger throughout journeys by road or rail.

By narrowing the field of view, you get to see as much as you need to see, blocking out everything else. This doesn’t take away your freedom to read a book or use your mobile phone.

Those who wear it often report that on a long journey the experience is much more relaxing with sleeping being quite common. This very often makes a long journey feel very much shorter helping the passenger to feel less stressed.

No more drowsiness from taking tablets.

Arrive at your destination feeling rested and ready for anything.

The visor is only effective for road or rail travel, sea sickness is a totally different sphere.

It must also be made clear that the Travel Visor must only be worn by passengers and must never be worn by the vehicle driver.

Click here for more about how to not get car sick.

If you know anyone who suffers from travel sickness, please share.

Tom Gamlin DesignerBy Tom Gamlin – from ideas come designs.

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